Spokesman: Scott Baio denies sexual misconduct claimsFebruary 15, 2018 12:01am

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Scott Baio "is denying each and every one of the allegations" made against him by two of his former co-stars on "Charles in Charge," his spokesman said Wednesday.

Brian Glicklich read a brief statement from Baio at a news conference held in response to the latest claim of misconduct.

Former "Charles in Charge" actor Alexander Polinsky said at a news conference earlier in the day that Baio assaulted and "mentally tortured" him when he was a child star on the show in the 1980s. He said Baio exposed himself, discussed gay sex acts and once threw a hot cup of tea in his face.

Another star of the series, Nicole Eggert, came forward last month with claims that Baio sexually assaulted her when she was a minor while they were working together.

Baio called those allegations false and said he and Eggert were involved in a consensual relationship when she was of legal age.

On Wednesday, Jennifer McGrath, an attorney for Baio, characterized the claims by Polinsky and Eggert as "ever changing" and evidence of "continual hunger for publicity." Glicklich also suggested the allegations were motivated by a desire for media attention.

McGrath confirmed, however, that the Los Angeles Police Department is investigating Eggert's allegations after the actress filed a police report against Baio last week. Glicklich said attorney Leonard Levine would represent Baio in that matter, and that he would be presenting the LAPD with evidence to refute Eggert's claims.

McGrath showed a photo of a smiling Polinsky and Baio that she said was taken at Baio's birthday party seven years ago. Glicklich referenced an interview Eggert had given years ago where she said working with Baio on "Charles in Charge" was fun and that she would be happy to work with him again.

Baio live-streamed the news conference on his Facebook page but did not attend. Glicklich and McGrath said he was at a school party with his daughter.

___

AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen is at www.twitter.com/YouKnowSandy .

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